Foray 30 June 2018 in Freeport

Forays are a benefit of membership.  If you are not a member you are welcome to check out one foray.  Should you decide to attend more forays, you must become a member.  It’s only $10 per year.

30 June , Saturday, 9:30am, Stonewood Trail, Stonewood Drive, Freeport. Host; Cheryl St. Pierre 725-4875 or 607-9226

This property is managed by the Freeport Conservation Trust and has well-marked trails. At the start of the trail you will find yourself in an upland forest with a large vernal pool area. The trails continue gently up and down, crossing streams and wet areas, through coastal mixed forest of large spruce, hemlock, and pine with middle age oak, fir and birch.

Directions: DeLorme map 6.

Take I-295 to exit 20 (Desert Road). Turn east on Desert Rd. towards Freeport Village. At the traffic light turn right onto rte. 1 south. Travel 1.2 miles to Stonewood Drive on your left, directly across from The Bike and Ski Shop. Drive to the end of Stonewood Dr. (About 0.1 mile) to the trailhead and parking.

{Science} Pollution, Tree Health, and Ectomycorrhizal Fungi

“Environment and host as large-scale controls of ectomycorrhizal fungi” can be found in Nature Volume 558, pp. 243–248 (2018).  By the way, I’ve never seen so many authors on an article before–Sietse van der Linde,  Laura M. Suz,  C. David L. Orme,  Filipa Cox,  Henning Andreae,  Endla Asi,  Bonnie Atkinson,  Sue Benham,  Christopher Carroll,  Nathalie Cools,  Bruno De Vos,  Hans-Peter Dietrich,  Johannes Eichhorn,  Joachim Gehrmann,  Tine Grebenc,  Hyun S. Gweon,  Karin Hansen,  Frank Jacob,  Ferdinand Kristöfel,  Paweł Lech,  Miklós Manninger,  Jan Martin,  Henning Meesenburg,  Päivi Merilä,  Manuel Nicolas,  Pavel Pavlenda,  Pasi Rautio,  Marcus Schaub,  Hans-Werner Schröck,  Walter Seidling,  Vít Šrámek,  Anne Thimonier,  Iben Margrete Thomsen,  Hugues Titeux,  Elena Vanguelova,  Arne Verstraeten,  Lars Vesterdal,  Peter Waldner,  Sture Wijk,  Yuxin Zhang,  Daniel Žlindra, and Martin I. Bidartondo–quite a team effort! And it sounds like it had to be, what with 137 forests across Europe, 13,000 soil samples, and 40,000 tree roots to analyze.  The study, prompted by declining tree health across Europe, found that air and soil quality impacts soil fungi composition, which in turn effects tree nutrition.  

This looks like an interesting research paper so I’ll need to hunt it down in a library since I don’t subscribe to the journal NATURE.  A summary of the article can be found on the website of Imperial College London (one of the investigating institutions) here.

 

 

Homola Scholarship

Applicants are still being sought for the Homola Scholarship to attend the Northeast Mycological Federation’s Annual Samuel Ristich Northeast Mycological Foray (NEMF).  The deadline is 31 May.  NEMF 2018 is 26-28 July at SUNY Geneseo.  For more information about this annual mycological event continue here.

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Gary Marshall, RIP, Jul 1935 – 7 Mar 2018

Gary died at home on the evening of March 7. Gary took over as Treasurer and Membership director in 1988 when we had 56 members, now nine of them remain. He was only our second treasurer and membership director, in 33 years!

MMA was important to him. At the end of David’s presentation last week he wondered when the next was, and was visibly disappointed that it wouldn’t be until 14 April. He totally enjoyed that Mary Yurlina scheduled programs for December for the past two years. He was a total Luddite, refusing to take his computer (yes, he had one) out of the closet, preferring to maintain membership data in a card file, and typing the list on his old manual typewriter. But he would travel hours for a program or foray, drawing the line only when we went to Aroostook, though he said that’s where his grandmother was born. He came to Maine from Oregon, and though he missed the phenomenal mushrooms of the temperate rain forest, he seemed to plant himself in Maine without regrets.

After he retired, and even before, he was dedicated to taking care of the widows in his neighborhood: no matter how snarly some of them were, and some of them were, extremely, he was kind to them, taking them places, shoveling them out, watching after them.

Do you remember that Gary always came up with some of the most interesting finds at forays, showing them almost reluctantly after we were well into discussion? Do you know that he found them by showing up at every foray earlier than everyone else? For such a tall man, he was good at finding the small, most obscure fungi.

Some remembrances, feelings from other members: dear, dear man; speechless and bereft; heartbroken; quiet but strong enthusiasm about everything fungi; will miss his dryly witty treasury reports; quiet, unassuming man, attending every foray I’ve ever been to; Mr. Reliable. Such a loss; I’ve known him 30 years, and will miss him.

Michaeline Mulvey

Urban Mushrooming

by Jonathan Mingori

Most of us associate mushrooms with forests, fields, and areas of nature, yet fungi are everywhere among us. When we take the time to look or explore at any opportunity, we can be amazed at what is to be found.

This summer I specifically sought urban fungi: mushrooms that grow in parks, along bike paths and sidewalks, on woodchips and tree stumps of the neighborhood streets of Montreal. This was not to seek edibles as much as the pure curiosity of what would be found other than the ubiquitous Coprinellus micaceus or the occasional decaying Agaricus. As for edibility, one has to greatly consider the proximity of said fungi to industrial pollution as well as human and animal traffic. A fine edible may very well have been frequented by numerous dogs prior to discovery.  The diversity of species and personal new discoveries found were impressive when I made it a point to investigate. One has to be out early, even in the rain, to find something like Parasola plicatilis. A keen eye on woodchips could reveal bird’s nest fungi. An alley raised bed garden may have some Lepiota sprouting. That rotted hole at the base of a large maple providing canopy for the street certainly is a potential spot for a magical find of Gymnopilus junonius. Rotted stumps and logs boast a variety from oysters to ascomycetes and numerous perennials. And the double ringed Agaricus bitorquis (see photo on page 1) is prolific along sidewalks and bike paths.

Here is a list of some of the species found this year:

Agaricus arvensis

Agaricus bitorquis

Agaricus bitorquis

Agaricus placomyces
Agaricus placomyces

Bisporella citrinum
Bisporella citrina

Calocera cornea
Calocera cornea

Coprinellus flocculosus
Coprinellus flocculosus

Coprinopsis atramentaria
Coprinopsis atramentaria
Coprinus comatus
Coprinus comatus

Cyathus stercoreus
Cyathis stercoreus

Daldinia childiae
Daldinia childiae

Flammulina velutipes
Flammulina velutipes

Geastrum sp.
Geastrum sp.

Gymnopilus junonius
Gymnopilus junonius 2Gymnopilus junonius 1

Ischnoderma resinosum
Ischnoderma resinosum

Lepiota cristata
Lepiota cristata

Oxyporus populinus
Oxyporus populinus

Parasola plicatilis
Parasola plicatilis
Pleurotus ostreatus
Pleurotus ostreatus

Pluteus longistriatus
Pluteus striatus

Vascellum (Lycoperdon) curtisii
Vascellum curtisii 1
Vascellum curtisii 2and, Volvariella bombycina.

No matter where we may live, there are always some fungi to be sought and found.

Photo credits: Jonathan Mingori

Friends School opens Mushroom Museum

Friends School opens Mushroom Museum

After a semester-long study of fungi, Kindergartners of the Friends School of Portland debuted a Mushroom Museum at their Cumberland Foreside campus.

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The gala opening on December 14 featured a ticket booth, exhibits on mushroom habitats, cultivation and mycophagy, and also included mushroom art, poetry, and even a gift shop.  Pairs of Kindergartners were on rotating shifts overseeing the various stations and answering questions.

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Kindergarten teacher Aja Stephan oversaw the effort, with assistance from other faculty and staff and the families of the students.

The was even a joke wall!

Q: Why do toadstools grow so close together?  A: They don’t need mush room!
Q: Why did the mushroom get invited to all the parties? A: Because he was a fun guy!
Q: What goes best with jacket potatoes?  A: Button Mushrooms!

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MMA  is very pleased to present a Commendation to these young mycologists for their outstanding work.

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Winter Speaker Series

Mike McNally

Simple Techniques for Growing Mushrooms at Home

January 20, Saturday, 11:00 am, Curtis Memorial Library (Morrell Reading Room), 23 Pleasant St, Brunswick

You probably know Mike from his articles about cultivation in previous issues of Mainely Mushrooms. Now it’s time for the visuals. Join Mike in Brunswick for a ‘show and tell’ session with equipment and a slide show. Mike tells me that the key word for what he wants to convey is “simple”. Anyone, he says, can grow mushrooms without spending a lot of money on equipment and commercial spawn. Mike has honed techniques for growing oyster mushrooms indoors on old coffee grounds and wood pellets and wine caps in his backyard. He’ll bring his collection of liquid cultures for several mushrooms species that can be used to inoculate prepped grain.

Directions: From I-295, take exit 28 (Brunswick, Route 1/Coastal Route). Continue east on Route 1 (Pleasant Street). At the third light continue straight where Route 1 bears left. Pleasant Street is now one-way. Curtis Library is 2.5 blocks down Pleasant Street on the right across from the Post Office. There is on street parking and additional parking behind the library. Please use the side entrance to the Morrell Meeting Room.

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Seanna Annis

The Fungi of Peatlands

February 4, Sunday, 11:00 am, Belfast Free Library, 106 High St., Belfast

Please join us at the Belfast Free Library for a talk by University of Maine Mycology Professor Seanna Annis.  Seanna studies the genetic diversity, physiology and molecular biology of various fungal pathogens that attack low-bush blueberry.  Her field work takes her to where the Ericaceae grow (blueberry, huckleberry, cranberry)–heaths and peatlands.  She’ll explain the environmental conditions of a peatland, where fungi are found, and what they are doing there. After the lecture, you’ll still have time to get ready for that Super Bowl party.

Directions: Follow Route 3 to Belfast. From the Route 1 intersection take Main Street for 0.7 miles. Bear slightly left to stay on Main Street. In less than 0.1 mile take the first right onto High Street. The Belfast Free Library is on the right in less than 0.1 mile just past Spring Street and diagonally across from the Belfast Co-op. Parking is on street.

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Kevin Smith

Plant disease and wood decay as agents of geopolitical and philosophical change

February 18, Sunday, 11:30 am, Curtis Memorial Library (Morrell Reading Room), 23 Pleasant St, Brunswick

The common wood decay fungi we see as brackets, superficial crusts, and ramifying mycelium play an enormous role in the natural development of trees and forests. The common view of wood decay is in terms of lost value. This presentation will focus on a few examples of wood decay and other well-known fungi as responsible for pivotal events in cultural history, geopolitics, and the philosophy of science.

Kevin is a plant physiologist and forest researcher with the U.S. Forest Service in Durham, NH. His research specialties include studying decay fungi and the responses of trees to storm related injuries.

Directions: From I-295, take exit 28 (Brunswick, Route 1/Coastal Route). Continue east on Route 1 (Pleasant Street). At the third light continue straight where Route 1 bears left. Pleasant Street is now one-way. Curtis Library is 2.5 blocks down Pleasant Street on the right across from the Post Office. There is on street parking and additional parking behind the library. Please use the side entrance to the Morrell Meeting Room.

 

OldDesignShop_MushroomParasol1858 (1)

David Porter

Mycorrhizae

March 3, Saturday, 11:00 am, Belfast Free Library, 106 High St., Belfast

David is a retired academic, teaching occasionally at CoA and Eagle Hill and editor of your newsletter. He has long been interested in the cooperative interactions of fungi and other organisms. This illustrated presentation will focus on mycorrhizas, the well-known, but poorly understood, symbiotic association between soil fungi and terrestrial plants. What fungi are involved? Why does this complex and taxing association persist? How may we as gardeners, farmers, and foresters take advantage of this remarkable inter-kingdom cooperation?

Directions: Follow Route 3 to Belfast. From the Route 1 intersection take Main Street for 0.7 miles. Bear slightly left to stay on Main Street. In less than 0.1 mile take the first right onto High Street. The Belfast Free Library is on the right in less than 0.1 mile just past Spring Street and diagonally across from the Belfast Co-op. Parking is on street.

 

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POSTPONED

Liam Torrey

The Gott’s Collection (The Mushrooms of Great Gott and Little Gott Islands, Maine)

Liam, a graduating senior at College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, took on a five-month long exploration of the fungi of the Gott Islands off the coast of Mount Desert Island last year. This ambitious project involved geotagging, identifying, and preserving specimens of the macrofungi of these two islands. When we checked in at the beginning of September, Liam had over 100 species photographed, identified, spore printed, and dried for the COA herbarium. We’re looking forward to learning more about her field season on the islands and what mushrooms she found.

Directions: Take Route 1 and 3 east to Ellsworth. Follow Route 3 south for 17.5 mi to College of the Atlantic before Bar Harbor. Turn left onto the campus at the first entrance. Several parking areas are available. Gates is in the central quadrangle across from the library and admissions building.